Back to craftsmanship with BloomLoom Studio

We are seeing that fast fashion does not work, that globalization in trade is not always the best option. That going back to craftmanship doesn’t have to involve a setback. Employing artisan techniques together with new designs or concepts is nothing more than the future of the textile industry. 

Fashion is temporary, but style is timeless. Certainly, the choice of clothing says a lot about someone. But we tend to see fashion or decoration; textile industry in general, as something visual. When in the first place it is something practical and essential, necessary. Then, it is all about the sensorial experience (textures, materials, matter). And finally, it is a whole universe of creativity. And there is no creativity in something serialized. There is nothing practical or sensorial in bad qualities and bad materials.

 

 

The soul of a fabric, the key to everything, is how it is made.

Increasingly, crafts have strength again in our society. And artisan techniques, reinvented, are the future of this industry if we dare to see it with new approaches. I present to you Cris, and her Bloomloom Studio brand, an example of sustainable fashion

1. Could you summarize what bloomloomstudio is about?

Bloomloom is a study of fabrics and sustainable fashion in which we want to rescue and raise awareness of craftsmanship, recovering lost textile techniques such as natural dyes, botanical printing and tapestries; all under the framework of sustainability. Currently we collaborate with sustainable designers in the production of fabrics for their collections, we also produce our own home products and accessories. All this is closely linked to sustainability, since we want to return to manual processes where there is respect for the earth and living beings.

We believe that the value of a society can be seen in the development of its own creativity and for this reason we do not want to lose the knowledge that many communities have been developing over time.

Therefore, our fabrics and the techniques we work with are completely sustainable.

3. Where or how did the original idea come from? Have you always been a creative person?

 

It is a project that has been developing as an idea for a long time. I have worked as a fast fashion designer for many years and continually came to the conclusion that my personal values ​​collided with the values ​​of fast fashion, with which I ended up very discouraged and did not want to continue being complicit in a system that was not with me. . It is complex, because when you work in Spain, it seems that the only possible way out as a designer is fast fashion, but I am working to publicize that there are other possible ways.

About half a year ago I gave up on fast fashion projects to get fully involved in Bloomloomstudio, a quality textile craft revival project to create conscious, ethical and “slow” fabrics and apparel. One of our goals is to restore real value to textile products, as I believe that with the growth of fast fashion we have lost the notion of what it really costs to make a fabric with a purpose and in a conscious way.

Since I was little I have been truly attracted and curious about how colors are generated and how they influence textures and my family, especially my grandmother (who continues to sew today, knit and crochet), I have learned the love with which Everything made by hand is transmitted, so the main basis of the study is to fully investigate the interaction of colors and textures in a craftsmanship process.

Fabrics and nature speak to us, they react to all the processes we give them and not everything works with everything … Something that I consider fascinating is the continuous surprise when discovering a new color or a new texture. For example, in the dyes we are creating different “recipes” seeing how the fabrics react and they always assure us hidden surprises that make them unique. In the tapestries, the fact of using one material or another completely modifies the design, thickness and even the use that can be given to the piece, they usually do not have a previous design, they arise every time as if it were a meditation . The initial idea is a small starting point that only time will end up confirming.

 

3. Where do you get the inspiration for each fabric or dye?  Any curiosity that you can tell us about your designs and mainly, the artisan process, is welcome.

We don’t usually have very fixed inspirations from the beginning. By working and using nature, we let it be the one that imposes its laws and we only become its hands. We bet on experimentation with each fabric, on how we feel with each step and what each color mixture transmits to us. Those emotions are what we want to transmit with each fabric. Both the dyes and the tapestries take a long process, but slow time is one of the characteristics of our product, because it allows us to do things with the respect and care they deserve.

The first thing we do is look for the bases either for the fabrics or for the threads of the tapestries. The main characteristics are that they are close, sustainable, durable and as far as possible biodegradable, so that our passage affects the Earth we live on as little as possible.

Then comes the process of dyeing, weaving and wicks of yarn, and this is when the longest and most beautiful stage for us begins. Everything we use will affect the final product, the type of water, the etching salts, where the plants and roots have grown, the weather … It is wonderful !!! With the same dye, we obtain as many shades as we have used fabrics and highlights. Although we try to replicate it, we will not get two equal pieces. Each fabric is truly unique!

 

After the dye stage comes the printing process, if the fabric requires it, where we are doing a study of world artisan techniques. In the case of the tapestries, we use the wick and the dyed threads to make new compositions creating emotions around the mixture of shapes and color.

It is a fascinating world in which you connect with the materials offered by nature itself and with the techniques that small communities have developed over time.

 

4. Finally, where would you like to go in the future?

 

I would always like to move towards a more sustainable business model. This is and will continue to be our number one goal. You can always do more in this field. Also regarding the recovery of textile techniques, learn them and make them known. We are going to launch in October a capsule collection of timeless clothing made with dyed, printed and tapestry fabrics. It will be like passing the nature of flat canvas to volume. It will be a collection on request, since we do not want to produce more waste, so we will also have upcycled garments that we have rescued. With this collection we will offer the repair service: that is, if any garment is damaged we will take care of arranging it to last you as long as you want and if it is not possible, we will turn it into another product so that you can continue enjoying it in another format 🙂

We hope to participate in flea markets, if conditions allow it, to publicize our work and be able to share this little piece of nature and crafts with everyone who wants and the launch of our website. At the moment the only way to know our product is through Instagram.

And something we are looking forward to … together with other fashion brands that share our same values, we are going to open a collaborative coworking space that will revolve around sustainable fashion and crafts, uniting all stages of the production process in the same space, like the artisan guilds of the past.

In this space we will have our store and workshops open to anyone who wants to come to know a little more about our creative processes. And we will do cultural activities around sustainability, such as talks, exhibitions and craft workshops. It will be a very very active space where we will support the change to a new form of production and consumption.-Cris

 

 

Thank you very much Cris, this was very interesting! And the space inspired by craft guilds … I’m looking forward to meeting you when it’s ready! The future of the textile industry is ideas like these, innovation added to tradition; with sustainability as the basis.

 

 

All photos belong to Cris from Bloom Loom Studio, and have been authorized to be shared on this blog to illustrate the interview.

 

 

 

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